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surveillance. the same thing could become true in america. i have a 12-year-old son. he is my middle child. he is the third one. remember ay cannot time when america was not at war. has been alant
. the question we are faced with is, you need five years worth of data on everyone in america so that the haystack -- >> that is a fair question. , it may well be
. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies.
of trayvon martin and young people all across america and has so painfully demonstrated. but, despite the influences and challenges we face, we are here today to affirm the dream. we are not going to be we are not going to be distracted. we are not going to be defeated. instead, we are going forward into this uncertain future with courage and determination to make the dream a vibrant reality. so, the work to fulfill the dream goes on. and despite the daunting challenges we face on the road to the beloved community, i feel that the dream is sinking deep and nourishing roots all across america and around the world. may it continue to thrive and spread and help bring justice, peace and liberation to all humanity. thank you and god bless you all. [cheers and applause] >> please welcome reverend [applause]e king. >> president obama, mrs. obama, president carter and clinton, congressman lewis, ambassador young, my brother martin iii, to my entire family. i was five months old when my father delivered his "i have a dream" speech and i probably was somewhere crawling on the floor or taking a
big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
.c. should be the 51st state of the united states of america. statehood for 600,000 residents . finally, let it go forth that this is not only a commemoration, a continuation, but what you have here are two generations that have come together. there's a lot said about the joshua generation, the younger people. but i remind them it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side by side together and so let this be a day in which moses points the way for joshua and the walls of segregation, of racism, materialism come tumbling down. with that, let me introduce our first speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy, committee of the national egislation, dr. michael chang. the day after king died, robert kennedy spoke on the mindless men as of violence. here is what he said. what has violence accomplished? what has it created? we tolerate a rising level of violence. we flor if i killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire weapons. we honor swagger and wielders of force. we excuse those who are willing to
and every one of us, in unity, in unison, letting those who say that they managed this country of america know that it is the people. it is the voice and the actions of the people that say, we must overcome, and eventually say, we have overcome, because of the involvement of each and everyone. that is our challenge today. let us move for and do what we must do, remembering freedom is not free. we must work for it. [applause] >> peaceful coexistence was a hallmark of dr. king's teachings. he said we must learn to get to live as brothers or perish as fools. welcome the rev. christian stone, and the president of asian american advancing justice. >> greetings from the fellowship of reconciliation, working since 1915 to secure a world of justice and freedom from through nonviolence. today, 50 years after the march on washington, i pay tribute to the visionary organizer of the original march by rustin. as a fellowship of reconciliation staff, rustin co- founded and organized the first freedom ride in 1947. an african-american gay man, rustin was a quaker. his life commitment to nonviolence as a
of america. residents.or 600,000 forth thatt it go this is not only a commemoration of continuation. but what you have here are two generations that have come together and there is a lot said about the joshua generation. the younger people. them, it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side-by-side together and so let this be a date in which moses points the way for joshua the walls of segregation of racism and materialism come tumbling down. our that, let me introduce irst speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy friends committee, a national legislation, dr. michael shank. >> the day after martin luther king died, robert kennedy spoke on violence. here is what he said, what has violence accomplished and created? we tolerate a rising level of violence that ignores our common humanity. we glorify killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire at weapons. we honor the wielders of force. we excuse those willing to build their lives on the shattered dreams of other. there is another violence just a
-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> senator mark pryor is joining us this week on "the communicators." your full committee recently approved tom wheeler to the sec. senator cruz,, has talked about putting a hold on that nomination. any word on that right now? >> we are working on that. the may 1 say, thank you for having me on. people in arkansas to watch c- span lot, i want to thank c-span for what they do. back to the tom wheeler nomination, basically there is sentiment within the senate that we ought to repair this with the republican nominee. have acans would like to republican to go alongside the process. the problem is the we have not thecially released republican name that they want nominated. hopefully we will get this done quickly and senator rockefeller has said this publicly that he wanted to expedite that. my view is that you do not have to pare them. it ink that if we can do such a way that it does not , it will beme protracted and i would go ahead to try to get tom wheeler on. >> one of the co
, but that is a dangerous belief, said the president. dr. king called america the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. he was right. and still is today. when profit motive and property rights are considered more important than people, he said, militarism is incapable of being conquered. a true revolution of values will look and easily on the glaring contrast to party and well. thise revelation will say way of settling differences is not just. american can lead the way in the revolution of values. no document can make these humans any less of our brothers. the true meaning of compassion and non-parlance is when it helps us to see the enemies point of view. there is nothing to prevent us from re- ordering our priorities. the pursuit of peace will take precedence over the pursuit of war. let us practice what they -- >> ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the national but justice coalition -- of the national black justice coalition. >> one of my mentors told me in order to truly be free, you must give to causes greater than yourself. every day, and educate, allocate, and celebrate the lot
struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the greaped, america needs a new marshall plan for our city to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's extra dation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he thought the -- sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace and equality. we must embrace that love and cease the violence. no more senseless newtown or columbines, no more daily killings of our young people by our young people on the streets of chicago and countless neighborhoods across the country. we need more gun control but we also need more love. yes, we all need love for each other, blarks white, and yellow, red and brown, gay and straight, christians muslims and jews. and all of god's children loving one another. we must embrace love and hold on to that powerful spiritual which inspired my father's generation and inspires us still today. we aren't going to let nobody turn us around. we aren't going to let n
and other opportunities that we're all hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. so recent studies have shown that throughout the united states, but also in iowa, that all growth in work force in the next 30 years will be attributable to immigrants, because of this demographic of retiring baby boomers and the generation coming after them. and of course also as i think senator harkin alluded to, we also need to not only fill jobs that are are currently here, but we need to create jobs, we need known vagues. and this is where immigrants have really contributed to america as well. immigrants are are more likely as a group to start businesses. immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they are working in the high tech industries and that, than native born counterparts. then finally we have to remember that we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from the rest of the world. and that's true for our economy. so therefore our economy is not a zero sum game, our work force is not a zero sum game. businesses and workers adapt to changing policies and changing circumstances.
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
the nation. 1963od with dr. king in when he called on america to be true to its principles. five years later, dr. king stood without me in the sanitation workers of local 1733 demanded justice, dignity and respect. the journey for civil rights, workers rights and economic rights began almost in the moment america was born. it gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned standup, fight back and march forward. because our struggle continues, we come to this but mario not only to commemorate -- this memorial, not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. we have a power to carry determination, hope and passion of the march on washington forward. we must also have the courage. when must also have the courage. in the name of dr. king, a philip randolph, bayard rustin, john lewis. on behalf of those whose names will never be known. we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor , to the ceo and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. we have the responsibility to
in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slow up. we have a moral obligation to press on because of our love for america and our love for the democratic way of life, we must keep moving. in san francisco in 1956 to the mall in 1963 to america today, dr. king's message endures. we must keep moving. our heritage and our hope. advancing civil or voting rights. within two years after the march, there would be a historic civil rights act and a voting rights act. that is
opportunities that, you hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. studies have shown that throughout the united iowa, that also in all growth in workforce in the 30 years will be attributable to immigrants. because of this demographic of retiring baby-boomers and the after them.oming and, of course, also, i think, alluded to, we also need to fill jobs that are currently here. need to create jobs, we need innovation. this is where immigrants have contributed to america as well. immigrants are more likely as a roup to start businesses, immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they're high-tech the industries and that than native foreign counterparts. and then finally, we have to we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from rest of the world. economy.'s true for our and so therefore our economy is sum game. our workforce is not a zero sum game. usinesses and workers adapt to changing policies and circumstances. so we work with the rest of the a sense we're in competition for the rest of the world. or exports, imports, and workforce. so immigration from the business sh
.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply and labor demand. all of those questions do not require amnesty. you can get all of the economic benefits that people talk about in fixing our broken immigration system without giving amnesty at this time. that is the position we support. unfortunately in this environment right now, the moment something passes the house, the pressure on immigration, which has dissipated over the last couple of weeks and months, will immediately be back in the forefront. >> you can watch the entire interview with michael needham of heritage action form for america on newsmakers -- on "newsmakers" sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern and 6:00 p.m
joining forces, we are so proud of the work you've done to help rally america around military families and veterans. i'm inspired by what they're doing, so thank you, michelle, for your extraordinary work. join at was proud to your convention three years ago. [applause] it is wonderful to be back. i want to thank your national much.der, thank you so teame entire leadership johnson, burgess, don adams, all the incredible spouses and spouses that the dav auxiliary. i want to thank barry janowski. i got it. [laughter] they used to mispronounce obama, too. [laughter] i want to thank barry and your grade team in washington. disabled american veterans, like all veterans, you carry in your hearts the story of brave service that took you to every as young men earth , leftmen, you left home everyone you ever knew because clouds gathered far across the sea. you had your whole life ahead of you, but you were willing to risk all of it for this land that we love. because you know from hard experience what we must never our country and doors because in every generation there are americans like you w
and put a platform together that focuses on them. not everybody in america wants a business and money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work in community groups. spend time at their church. we, as republicans, believe that is a good thing. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an agenda of ideas to raise up folks who want to vote for us. you saw the last election. they did not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. the second thing is we need to talk less about the culture. he people who do this is those who do not want to talk about culture in the first place. as a result, do not engage as we have in this party. i will give you an exa
. -- andrybody in america money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work and community groups. spend time at their church. we as republicans believe that is a good inc.. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. -- that is a good thing. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an upnda of ideas to raise folks who want to vote for us. you side and the last election. they do not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. --st and foremost, we need first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build to becoming, everybody will be fine. -- if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. [applause] the second inc. as we be to talk less about the culture area -- thing is we need to talk less about the culture. the people who do this is who do not want to talk about culture in the firs
coverage of what is happening in the world as well as what is happening in america. from here is a call next alabama. welcome. walter, are you there? you're on the air. i had a brother served in vietnam. realize like going into a rack them of the women, and putting our boys over there and women and the people here were calling in criticizing. if they would take a gun and do something like that, it is different. if it were not for our armed forces, we would be controlled by other countries. just like in the united states, these folk who rob banks or stuff and this that going on all the time. ain't none of us perfect, but i think our soldiers are doing a good job. media,o you think the the usb then, does a good job of covering our efforts in afghanistan and before that to my iraq? host: i sure do. i sure do.ler: host: go ahead. i am a former korean, vietnam veteran, and to make -- to me, the meeting is you have two efferent sides of the story from different angles. i tend to go to the foreign media to see what they think of us. at the same time, i think the lady talked about looking at wh
wufpblet yet america's indigent defense systems continue to exist in a state of crisis and the promise of gideon is not being met. [applause] to address this crisis, congress must not only end the forced budget cuts that have decimated public defenders nationwide, they must expand existing indigent defense programs, provide access to council for more juvenile defendants, and increase funding for federal public defender offices. [applause] and every legal professional must answer the a.b.a.'s call to contribute to this cause through pro bono service and help realize the promise of equal justice for all. [applause] as we come together this morning, this same promise must lead us all to acknowledge that although incarceration that is has a significant role to play in our justice system, widespread incarceration at the federal, state, and local levels is both ineffective and unsustainable. it imposes a significant economic burden, totaling $80 billion in 2010 alone, and it comes human and moral costs that are impossible to calculate. as a nation, we are goled coldly efficient in our incarc
, i think we could not be in a much better place than america to have this discussion right now. i am joined by a fabulous panel of experts. usy are going to enlighten and him pack the relationship between growth in texas. many have probably seen him on tv. it ordered member of the wall street journal, he writes about immigration, taxes, many things. i am sure you have read his articles. he has been an advocate for years, a scholar, and we are privileged to have you here, steve. thank you for coming. youthing you do well is look state-by-state a lot. you talk about growth and you look at the state and evidence. and what are growing role are immigrants playing in the country? >> first of all, when amity called me and asked me to come here to dallas to speak, i leapt amthe opportunity, because i an admirer of george w. bush. thank you for the invitation. thunder a little bit when you talk about four percent growth year it i would add to what you said, that i do not think we can accomplish four percent growth without immigration. it is a precondition to get to that higher growth rate. it
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
at this point in time in america. >> she is not political, she is not speaking out politically the way that abigail did with her husband. she is not a public political figure speaking out on these things. she has her own private views on some things. her views on politics are more about how people behaved. she is much more interested in everyone conducting themselves properly. even people on her own side. she doesn't like it when people who support the policies that her husband supported have crossed a line in terms of decorum. she is not trying to get out -- she's not an activist. i would not want to say that. >> nearly 100 years until women have the right to vote, we should point out for our younger viewers. what role could they play? where did their power come from? >> there is a coda to this story. just as john quincy became more and more outspoken in his opposition to slavery, and famously played a role in the amistad case. there was something between louisa and the green key sisters, who were pioneering activists and abolitionists of their day. i think she comes as close there as
a time of tightening budgets. live at 9:30 a.m. eastern. the new america foundation examines electronic surveillance and human rights with access now, an organization that focuses on individual's access to the internet and their right to privacy. that is live at 6:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. former secretary of state clinton clinton speaking about voting rights, and u.s. supreme court's decision to strike down part of the voting rights act. she she accepted the american bar association's ada metal -- in the causevice of american justice. from san francisco, this is 35 minutes. [applause] >> thank you, thank you very much. thank you all very much. thank you. [applause] thank you very much. thank you, mr. bellows, mr. chairman, members of the house of delegates, incoming president, friends and colleagues, long time members of the aba. i am so deeply grateful to you for this award. i am humbled by those who have received it in the past. to join their company, and in some small measure, to continue the work that the aba has championed. i know that earlier you're from you heard from attorney
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
, turkey, as well as israel. america does not need to act alone. we have learned this the hard way in our history that if we go it alone, we put ourselves in jeopardy. when asked in a community of countries that share the same values, we can be a lot more effective. we can bring back stability to a region that is way too unstable. >> thank you. >> an important factor to be with the next senator of new jersey is who has the experience and sophistication to deal with international questions will stop i talked about the complicated situation in that part of the world. if you pull on one, it pulls through jordan, saudi israel,egypt, palestine, and a rant, anorak, , andurkey -- and iran iraq, and turkey. i sent a letter to the president saying that he should ask the new iranian president if he is good to his word. he did appoint someone i know from their time at the united nations as foreign minister. and gives us time to work with a ran on these competent matters -- it gives us time to work with matters.hese important >> on capitol hill, in the last notle of sessions, we have seen a lot of ex
is this year her share of the federal debt is $54,000. every man, woman, and child in america owes a piece of that debt. now what congress has not figured out how to do is balance the budget. i think the essence of this program, and we talk about this money coming in, and 90% forever , the question is, who is paying for it? we borrow all this money from china. china has a billion people in the navy. we have to pay them back one day. that is what the essence of the discussion is. it boils down to, i'm not trying to judge what i'm telling you, but i think the essence here of what they are talking about is what is the proper of role of government and what is the proper role of the taxpayers and how much more of this should be taxed, paid for, and how much should be spent. that's really what this is caught up in. it's not about congress' benefits. ot this time anyway. >> one of the things when we passed obama care, we made some changes in medicare. i think everybody in here remembers $716, the number of billions of dollars. when the dust settles, the congressional research service estimates th
black people but also white people. to know that a nation, such as america and the reason i struggle with it so hard because i really believe in the potential of this country. >> actor and civil rights activist harry boll phone -- belafonte. headline this morning the tallahassee democrat, a turning point and a quote from the mlk speech, i have a dream that this country will live out the true meaning of its creed that all men are created equal. our question as we begin on this wednesday morning, do marchs still make a difference? 202-585-3880 those of you under the and of 50. over 50, 202-585-3881. we begin with james joining us from grand fork, north dakota. caller: hey steve. calling again. i'm actually 49. right on the edge and i'm going to be 50. i'm not north dakotaian. i called before and i came out here for work for this hard to be a white man in suburbs of philadelphia. certain trades get displaced and you have to find your own way. i'm out here celebrating. i don't celebrate diversity. i noticed that c-span and msnbc there's an obsession with race. it's funny how white peopl
to as the forgotten war. because most all of the world knew about the importance of america being involved in saving emocracy in world war ii and vietnam. good or bad, people knew people that went there. but somehow in the middle of that, no one really missed us or knew where korea was or didn't appear that there was too much concern. d when we did return, unlike the vietnam veterans who really unfairly had been treated so unkind, fortunately for us, we were never missed except by our family and friends, people never they here we were and to us. weren't as kind veterans turned out from all over. comrades that were part of the 20 countries that were part of the united nations. and when north koreans invaded south korea, those of us who were called to go to south korea to defend them, we were going to a country that we never knew to fight for a people that we never met, for causes that were not well known. having said all of that, at the conclusion, and the war has never really been called a war, it still is a division between these people, but as a result of the united states and united nations' effo
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
could ask the staff to begin passing this out. he is going to be called america works, education and training for tomorrow's jobs. [applause] i think that is something that certainly democrats and republican governors along with our orbit fellows and our private sector members are very attuned to and very engaged with. thisd so many discussions past week about the importance of our economy, our workforce education, and how we align all of those systems to be able to meet our individual state cost needs. needs.e's how to build a workforce that will meet the needs of america. economic regions have become more competitive, not only the united states around the world. i work first has become more specialized, and we have more specialized services, more specialized skills. public very garish resources that are available for workforce training. we have a lot of different workforce programs, so we need a thoughtful, comprehensive approach that will prepare the workforce to keep pace with a very competitive global economy. it is an issue that not only calls for national attention, but it
is out. >> there are many mayors across the united states of america. i just finished a conference where we have a leadership meeting, and this was a huge topic of conversation for many of the mayor's. regardless of carter -- party. most of the time mayor's did not pay that much incentive to political parties. we have to make things happen. you want folks to get the health care and want them to be well and healthy. there is a growing group of mayors across the united states of america who are actively engaged in the process, and i will do my part here. >> it really is now time for us to activate the local advocacy community. the local outreach community, -- theased communities. faith based communities. wonderful organizations like congreso this cannot be done from within washington. it never has been the idea that it would be done. we need partners on the ground. that is why the navigator branch rolled out last week. every community health center in the country has gone resources to hire education and enrollment people. a lot of hospitals are training their own staff. we of train that se
in america. 42 years they followed a few thousand people. one of the conclusions they came to was it is not them. it is not them black folk. it is not them hispanics, it is now us. that is what you just saw in the representation of the panel. us is a pronoun, but also, very interesting letters, u.s. robert gates, the young man -- robert daye, a talk with him earlier and he said his biggest concern was getting involved, standing up, even speaking and being on the c-span for the world to see was fear. fear. fear that he might lose his job. the other thing that really moved all of us was the pain. i remember hearing congressman elijah cummings once get a speech and he said payne leads up to passion, and passion has to lead to a purpose. pain that brings about passion. we felt the pain and saw your faces and felt the pain. we now have to take the pain that brings passion, but the passion has to be what? it has to have a purpose. that leads me to the final point is, professor ron walters was once asked by students, what is the difference between a moment and the movement? becaus
, ladies and >> that is some big shoes to follow. party respects women across america. me greathy it gives pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. an awardeated to give to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. to tomar's award went harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] stage some me on women withdemocratic onhereto except the award senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary asham clinton was sworn in secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public fromls before graduating wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by jimmy carter to serve on the board of the legal
on how well america is prepared to deal with natural and man-made disasters. an intellectual exercise. i want to steal a sentence written by one of our panelists. a couple years ago, transmitting a plan for public health preparedness and response, dr. recent natural disasters. last five years alone, national and global health security have been stripped -- have been threatened. the deep water oil spill, the the japaneseake, tsunami and radiation release. that is a breathtaking list for only five years. today we are going to speculate on what the next five years will bring. there pleased to have robert wood johnson foundation, which has been helping americans enjoy healthier lives and get the care they need for 40 years now. have dr. johno lemkin, a senior vice president of the foundation and director . beforeealthcare group joining the foundation, he directed the illinois department he brings aalth, so great deal of experience and expertise. you for coming. this is a critical topic. tom my viewpoint i was able charge with participating in response for a number of disasters that many may
here, representing the rule committees. i want to tell everybody in america, tom cole is a reasonable member of this house. he's been a leader of this house. he wants to seek common ground in my view. so i do not criticize him but i say, mr. speaker, as you tap the gavel, time is not only running out on steny hoyer, time is running out on this house, time is running out on erica, time is running out americans who know their house is not working and now i yield back the balance of my time but we should not yield the balance of time for the american people and for our country. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has no time to yield back. the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from oklahoma is recognized. mr. cole: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. cole: my friend, and he is my friend is really one of the great speakers in this chamber. i mean that with all sincerity. but this isn't the senate. we don't have unlimited debate over here. kind of stretching it a little bit. but it's alway
. what is the gain for america? >> it is a gain for the rest of us in a couple of ways. we have to realize how many kids are the kids of immigrants. for example, in california, half of our kids have an immigrant parents. the gains that they make translate into the next generation, having more resources in the house. we can focus in on the earnings gain, but somebody who is a citizen starts to feel more comfortable about going to school, engaging with teachers, being involved in education. improving the schools, communities, neighborhoods. the gains don't stop with the families. we estimated that it is about $21 billion to $45 billion increase in earnings and spending power over 10 years. if we could take the 8.5 million folks who are not naturalized and naturalize half of them, those are the gains we would get. in texas, it is about $1 billion to $2 billion per year if you can move naturalization rates up. it is money we are leaving on the floor. >> you take half of the 8.5 million that could naturalize, you get up to $45 billion, over what amount of time? >> over 10 years. one
constellation tour. it is the last ship built in 1954 by the u.s. navy. heritage action of america held a town hall meeting in wilmington delaware. it is the last in a series of defundingsupport the the affordable care act law. >> hello, delaware valley. it is so great to be with you. i am part of the team at heritage action. the opportunity to be here in the first state is very exciting for all of us. thank you for the warm welcome. [applause] as you know, this is a nine city true -- nine city tour about defunding obamacare across the nation. we decided that delaware and the surrounding areas are important because weme to agree with vice president biden. this bill is a big deal. it must be defunded. [applause] last night, we were in pittsburgh. we were talking to them after the program was over and they were talking about how great the pirates were doing. that is exciting for those of you that are pirates fans. they told us to give you a hard time about how they are doing better than the phillies. i told them we would have to be careful about that because the eagles have done better in the pr
of america. all of the caucus indicated the support of his resolve. i now want to introduce my good friend, the assistant leader, who has been very focused all his life, but particularly now, on voting rights for all of our people, jim clyburn of south carolina. >> thank you, chair, democratic leader, my colleagues. i'm going to try and sum up the president's presentation to us today in just a few words. i would say a better life for america's middle class. we have been hearing a lot this year about a grand bargain, how to reduce the deficit, how to pay down the debt. how we go about trying to create jobs. all of us would agree that the one constant that is without the entire stream of things has been the growing inequality that exists in our system. i saw it described a couple days ago as our country is determined with the least amount of opportunity and the most inequality in our society. the president was very focused on what we need to do to create jobs to pay down our debt and deficits in a way that is fair and balanced and how to create the equality of opportunity for all of our citi
taxes. democrats want to give them more power? they want this agency involved in america's healthcare? no way. watchdogagency's own says the irs can't handle the job. , the inspector general stated they are not 'snfident about the irs ability to protect confidential information or protect fraud. neither am i. by any indication, neither are the american people. it has been three years since the healthcare law was passed. in less than two months, the administration claims it will be ready to implement the law. in the face of all these , more americans than ever want this law to be repealed. it is simple. increased healthcare costs to families and individuals. it has stifled individuals from expanding. it has forced job creators to cut hours. just yesterday, a key official could not confirm that the healthcare law was lowered in my home state of michigan. wasn't this the signature propolis -- promise of this administration? premiums would be lower. the administration cannot make good on that promise. with so little time before , it ises are set to open extremely concerning that the admin
of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? mr. shimkus: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to remember and recall the life of carla anderson. carla passed away on july 23, after a month-long fight against an infection. she was 52, a loving mother, devoted wife and deputy executive director of the next generation 911 institute. it was in this capacity that i had the privilege of working with her. technology continued to move forward, congresswoman anna eshoo and i worked closely as part of the congressional e-911 congress. she was part of legislation passed by congress to advance 911 services. in so doing, many lives have been saved. as first responders throughout the country could not on
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
. and they are using that right to vote to make america a better place for all of us to live in. brings more justice and to bring more fairness. we want to focus the conversation this afternoon a little more around women and immigration. i think -- i'm not enough has been said about our broken immigration system and how it impacts women. i wanted to share with you that it doesn't matter where i visited. add garlic field in salinas, or an orchard in oregon state, when i sit down and speak with women in the immigrant community, they all tell me the same thing. they share with me the horrible conditions they work at. the sexual assault and sexual abuse they were submitted to each and every day. i want everybody in this room to think for one moment. if our countries cannot protect the women in the armed forces of the united states of america, where there have been thousands of cases of assault already documented. i want you to to imagine what happens to the women in the field every day that pick the tomato, that pick the food, that pick the vegetables that are the cornerstone, the foundation of our agri
. [booing] over the next 15 months, we are going to decide what kind of america we want to have. what kind of kentucky want to have. there are only two answers to this question. barack obama's vision for america. or kentucky's. ground -- crowd does not like it. kentucky's voice is often the voice of opposition. to the obama agenda. i am proud of that. that is why every liberal in america, every liberal in america have announced they will beat us next year. know, the liberals are worried because it just as i predicted obama care is a disaster for america. [applause] i fought them every step of the way, every step of the government takeover. up to their war on coal. look, as long as i am in the senate, kentucky will have a voice. [applause] all of these liberals to come down here to push me around, they are not going to get away with it, are they? ind paul, it would fill, and -- ed whitfield, and i take the fight every single day. let me give you an example. a few months ago thomas the cannots decided that you fish below the dams below the river anymore. up the group and we got together with
. we have enough poor people here. is spinning out of control. let's take care of america first, and then we can help out our neighbors. but we will show you more of that debate later this evening, 1:20 in the morning, and in the west, 10:20 p.m. >> i just want to say that in if country here in america, anything took place here, we have already seen our allies, and if this event took country, we would be involved, and i think the whole world would be involved. you see your own children involved in something like this, you want to do something about it. children over in serial or in the uk or over here or somewhere else. >> eggs for your call, and getting your reaction about what happened in the british house of commons and what may happen with the obama decision on what the u.s. response would be. to 26ke this evening members of congress, according to reports. we will tell you more about that. this is from victor who said this debate is very rich and house of commons, and no one is holding back. a congressman from rhode island tweeted -- in forest hills, new york, on our democra
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
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